Thursday, February 22, 2018

Letters to the Editor

Editor January 18, 2018

FLOGGING A DEAD HORSE

Dear Editor,

The Shepparton City Council is flogging a dead horse if they think upgrading existing parking meters and making 75 parking bays free will solve the decline in the CBD. The Councillors are in denial. They don’t see the linkage in the decline to unfriendly parking tax meters.

They should be focusing on the reasons why the move for free parking has been made elsewhere, rather than trashing the idea without investigating successful operations at comparable cities where CBDs have grown after the removal of parking tax meters while Shepparton has declined.

Why not learn from Albury/Wodonga’s experience, after the removal of parking meters shoppers returned and investors had confidence to invest resulting in increased rate revenue, which more than replaced the obnoxious parking tax and their CBD’S are thriving. Council could also compare the rate of empty shops.

Yours sincerely,

NJ Sims

 

TIMED FREE PARKING IS ESSENTIAL

Dear Editor,

I would like to fully endorse the views of Robert Dodds (The Adviser, January 10, 2018). Timed free parking is essential if we want to see the Mall/CBD thriving. I really like the mall; it would be a shame to destroy it with its lovely greenery. People would take more time to enjoy it with free parking. The Marketplace and Riverside Plaza are thriving for this reason. Besides the mall, there are plenty of empty shops in Wyndham, High and Fryers streets. Timed free parking would encourage more shoppers to these areas as well. With Tank’s proposed street art, we could have a lovely, vibrant city. With the tourists expected when the new art gallery is finished, it would be nice if they could enjoy the city centre as well. At present, it is way behind the likes of Benalla, Bendigo and Ballarat.

Yours sincerely,

Ann Worcester

Shepparton

 

UNANSWERED QUESTIONS

Dear Editor,

Just thinking – there are so many unanswered questions.

From the day to day experiences and the struggle to meet the needs of each day there is the dilemma of what does it all mean. At the bottom of the food chain high minded questions are not asked.  To survive hostilities, displacement as a refugee or to be just plain hungry without adequate shelter is bleak. Even advanced nations have unemployed and homeless people.  The motive by big business to create big profit margins puts the squeeze on employees who may become redundant. Justice and injustice are catch cries, but who is listening.

What have we to say for ourselves? With three meals a day and a roof over our head, warm in winter and made cool in summer, even if earning a living and paying a mortgage is necessary, life has its better moments. Holiday breaks either public or that provided by employment are a comfort.  Yes, a proportion of our community is committed to the betterment of society in many ways.  If only we were all equally eager to bring about radical changes how much better that would be. Unfortunately we are creatures of habit. Also we fall into patterns of culture, sometimes good and sometimes harmful. One might think that being religious would be an advantage but tradition is entrenched more than anyone is prepared to admit. Overall there is good to be found and a way for living can be experienced. Compassion and justice are important, but are not exclusive to religious people, but are of a high priority among the committed.  Environmentalists have a concern for the restoration of our natural resources and who plead for action to stabilise the climate and are a voice of genuine lament, but they too are not on their own. Both the human condition and our environment are basic in our very survival.

There is work to be done now. Not one of us will bring wars to cease, or meet the needs of starving millions, or give comfort to victims of hostilities, but there are many organisations to which we can offer our support. We would like to think that those in government would show responsibility by leading the way. Unfortunately economics and national security are more often given priority over that of social reform or improving the health of our planet. The question for the meaning of life is relevant. This is an age old question. In part we know the basics for living. However being assured that we have both a sustainable world and one of harmony to live with one another needs to be given a greater priority. Love is a fuzzy word if it has no substance. Belonging and offering genuine care are in short supply in today’s society. Our words need to be backed up with serious out-reach of help to one another.

Wisdom, where and when will we find it? Unlikely in youth; middle years sometimes, or in age sometimes, but finding an era of good-will, peace, an end to poverty with respect for all is an ultimate goal.

Yours sincerely,

Alan English

Shepparton

 

EDUCATION GAME CHANGER

Dear Editor,

While I have great sympathy for the Turner family on the loss of Zaidee, I am rather dismayed at the latest step Zaidee’s Rainbow Foundation is taking. The aim is to employ a full-time educator to travel around schools to give a 30-minute presentation to students on the subject of organ and tissue donation. I was shocked to learn that the talks will be aimed at children between 7 and 15 years of age. Surely seven is far too young for children to be thinking of such matters. Children sometimes worry too much about things that they have no control over. The talks would be much better if they were given to students aged 15 years and over. Young adults can better understand the situation and make informed decisions.

Yours sincerely,

Ann Worcester

Shepparton